So: Did the Quake Move the Main Island of Japan by 8 Feet? No, 13!

Thirteen feet was the maximum, eight feet was the average, over a stretch of 300 miles.

The eastward shift was documented by Japan’s Geonet network of GPS monitoring stations, based in Tsukuba, said Ken Hudnut, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Earthquake Hazards Program in Pasadena, Calif. …

“When the earthquake occurs, the upper plate lurches eastward over the subducting plate. The oceanic plate that’s going down is relatively rigid, but the upper plate is like a wedge of material that’s more elastic. So picture that upper wedge as being almost like an accordion that’s being compressed between the times of earthquakes. It’s like a spring. You’re loading up the spring between earthquakes — in other words, you’re compressing the eastern edge of the spring toward the main island of Japan. The earthquake allows that material to spring out toward the east.”

PhotoBlog – How the quake shifted Japan

There’s more in this excellent article. Well worth the click.

 

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One Response to So: Did the Quake Move the Main Island of Japan by 8 Feet? No, 13!

  1. Pingback: Did the Quake Move the Main Island of Japan by 8 Feet? | Notes from The Pondonome

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