Thinking Pink

From a review by Anne Murphy Paul of “Cinderella Ate My Daughter,” by Peggy Orenstein:

until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self- appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

Book Review – Cinderella Ate My Daughter – By Peggy Orenstein – NYTimes.com

Very nice. Highly recommended.

 

 

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This entry was posted in Behavioral Science, Cultural Comment, Kids, Science and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

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